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Parent Coaching Institute
The Parent Express E-zine

 

The Parent Express E-Zine
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Parent Express for 28-Sep-2007

The PCI Send to Friend
Parent Express Ezine

Welcome to Parent Express, the PCI e-zine! Here you will find updates on the Parent Coaching Institute, along with ideas and practical tips for the parenting journey.

As the school year is now in full swing, our featured article, Three Key Strategies for Helping Children Become Great Writers, by PCI Certified Parent Coach® Kris Meyers, provides timely assistance. After all, when our kids write well, they also think coherently and have sound communication skills. And, the more they write, the better they think. Writing practice is thinking practice. Kris has worked for over 15 years improving the reading and writing skills of children. Her proven strategies will make many positive differences during this school year and well beyond for your children. For more information see Kris' informative Web site www.beyondtheabcs.com to sign up for her free e-mail newsletter. And…

Have fun reading all those creative stories, poems, and essays!

Gloria DeGaetano, Founder and CEO

PCI Training

PCI Now Taking Applications for January 08 Start Date

If you feel a calling to work with moms and dads in an innovative way; or if you are already working with parents and want to discover exciting ideas, fresh approaches and new tools to add to your experience, contact us at (425) 401-1519.

Applications are now being accepted for entrance Winter Quarter for the Parent Coach Certification® Training Program with phone classes for Course 1 beginning the second week of January 2008. Phone classes are in the evening time to accommodate work schedules of our students. Application deadline for Winter Quarter is December 1, 2007. Early applicants applying before November 1 will receive a $500.00 discount off tuition fee.

Please send in the basic application as your first step. Transcripts and letters of reference can follow the basic application by a few weeks. Download the application here. Send to the PCI at: 1400-112th Ave. SE, Bellevue, WA 98004. Questions? Please call: (425) 401-1519.

We require candidates to have an undergraduate degree and at least two years of either professional or volunteer experience working with parents in such capacities as a teacher, parent educator/mentor, counselor, mental health professional, social worker or community health worker.

Learn more about our acclaimed, graduate-level, distance-learning Parent Coach Certification® Program by clicking here for more information.

Check out our Video About the PCI Parent Coach Training Program and see what professionals think about their training with the PCI.

"I am so grateful to be a graduate of the PCI, where the very fiber of this institute is universally and authentically dedicated to the genuine well-being of families. The integrity of the institute, and Gloria's unending knowledge, and devotion to excellence, makes the PCI outstanding in its contribution to this important field of parent coaching and the world of parenting. Thank you PCI—I love being a change agent and a part of the PCI! "
—Lori Jo Kemper, The Parenting Path®
Minneapolis, Minnesota
www.theparentingpath.com

For Parents

Working with a parent coach who has received Parent Coach Certification® through the PCI is giving yourself a valuable gift as well as a sound investment in your family's future. PCI Certified Parent Coaches® are caring, thoughtful professionals with years of experience working with parents. They have successfully completed the PCI Parent Coach Certification® Training Program—a comprehensive academic one-year, graduate-level program in collaboration with Seattle Pacific University. Through a series of coaching conversations that can be either by telephone or in person, PCI Parent Coaches help you re-discover your dreams and design your life for more joy and satisfaction.

To find a PCI Parent Coach in your area, please click here or call (425) 401-1519 for a referral to a PCI Parent Coach selected especially for you.

PAR

Visit www.parentappreciationradio.com to listen to programs featuring PCI Certified Parent Coaches® and other experts from around the country discussing topics of interest to moms and dads.

Programs are available as podcasts. Listeners can download individual episodes directly, listen to them from this site using a Web browser, or via the iTunes podcast directory. iTunes subscribers will automatically pick up new episodes as they become available!


Featured Article

Three Key Strategies for Helping Children Become Great Writers

by Kris Meyers, PCI Certified Parent Coach®
www.beyondtheabcs.com

1. Getting a Good Idea

Whether someone is writing a newspaper article, a novel, a movie script or a song, the writing process always begins with an idea. Then the author's "job" is to take that idea and develop it. "Ideas are the heart of the message, the content of the piece and the details that enrich the theme" (from the book Seeing With New Eyes, NWREL). When the ideas are strong, writing is easy to follow and things make sense. But most of all, good ideas make a piece of writing interesting to read.

Good writers know that the best ideas often come from everyday events and real-life experiences. They are good at noticing things others might not notice. They are also good at coming up with original thoughts and ideas, rather than just re-writing the same thing again and again or repeating something they saw on TV.

One way parents and teachers can help young children develop good ideas for writing is by first showing them how to pay attention and notice the details in their everyday world. For example, having a child stop to notice the exact color of the sky or the different shapes of the clouds, gives them details they can use to make a picture or a piece of writing more interesting.

When adults read aloud to children, it is also helpful to talk about how the author might have gotten their idea for the story or book. For example, Virgina Lee Burton (author of Mike Mulligan and The Steam Shovel and other children's books) has said that she got her ideas by watching her son play with his trucks. Pointing out how "professional" authors get ideas, helps children better understand the writing process.

Here are some more helpful phrases parents and teachers can use to encourage children to develop their own ideas when they are drawing and writing.

  • Can you tell me more about that?
  • What else could you add to make this really interesting?
  • You are really good at noticing things.
  • I can really picture what you are talking/writing about.
  • I love that idea/topic! It makes me think about….
  • How did you come up with such an original idea?

Remember, writing is much more than handwriting or spelling: writing is thinking. When children learn how to express their thoughts clearly when they write, they are able to be successful learners in school and beyond!

2. Choosing the Right Word

Truly accomplished writers do more than use fancy words. Good authors choose words that are rich, colorful, and precise, but they also know how to use everyday language in a natural way to touch the reader.

Children who are read to often when they are young develop a natural curiosity about words. They often experiment with words and phrases in playful ways and stretch themselves to use new words when they talk.

Adults may also notice that children often imitate words or phrases that they have heard in literature. Doing this shows an awareness of language that will help a child develop the ability to choose just the right word when they write.

Read the Rest of the Article…

 

Media Coverage for Chicago PCI Parent Coaches

Cathy Adams, PCI Certified Parent Coach® and PCI instructor was featured in an article about parent coaching in the Chicago Tribune—photo with her daughters, included!

Cathy was also interviewed at WGN radio. This podcast will be on the PCI Web site—so stay tuned!

Producers for both Good Morning America and The Early Show contacted the PCI recently for information on parent coaching. They both said that the PCI was evidently the most professional parent coach training program "out there" and that they wanted to talk with the best, that is why they contacted the PCI. Both producers indicated that they will continue to keep the PCI in mind when looking for parent coaches to interview.

As a result of the phone conversation with Good Morning America, Jen Mangan, PCI Certified Parent Coach® in Chicago appeared on the program discussing the role of parent coaching during a feature story on Britney Spears.

Another Study Associates Early TV Viewing with Attention Problems

In our last month's newsletter we told you about the May 2007 study in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine which found that frequent television viewing during adolescence is associated with the risk for development of attention problems, learning difficulties, and adverse long-term educational outcomes.

Well, another similar study has been released. This study focused on younger children and found that children who watch more TV than two hours daily developed 40% more attention problems, according to a long-term study of more than 1,000 New Zealand children published in the journal Pediatrics. "Those who watched more than two hours, and particularly those who watched more than three hours, of television per day during childhood had above-average symptoms of attention problems in adolescence," researcher Carl Landhuis wrote.

DVDs and Babies

An August 2007 study in the Journal of Pediatrics demonstrated that each hour per day of viewing baby DVDs/videos was associated with a decrease in language development and parental bonding. For a discussion of the issues related to infants and screen machines, please see the article "When Should Children Begin Watching TV?"

Upcoming Events

Workshop Opportunity:
November 2

Advertising, Commercial Culture, and Children

Dr. Nilufer Ocel, Professor of Communications, University of Istanbul, and Gloria DeGaetano, founder of the PCI and author of Parenting Well in a Media Age.

Dr. Ocel will discuss the growing concerns in Turkey related to advertising and children. She will discuss the nature of communication for children and the communication environment in Turkey. Topics include home media, media exposure and peer impact, constructing identities and multiple identities, and children's identity and citizenship in Europe. In the afternoon session Dr. Ocel and Gloria DeGaetano will invite audience participation to discuss the growing concerns around the globe and what we as educators and parents can do about it in our homes, schools, and communities.

Friday, November 2
8:30 AM–4:00 PM
Cost: $105.00
(includes lunch and workshop materials)
Conference Center/Bellefield Office Park (directions given when registering)

To register: Please call (425) 401-1519 or email laura@thepci.org.


Parenting in an Age of Identity Theft™
by Gloria DeGaetano, founder, Parent Coaching Institute

In 1986 I decided to leave my position as a school district administrator in order to work with parents and teachers to help them thoughtfully counter media and popular culture's negative influences on children. I had enjoyed my career in public education. But two decades ago I realized one startling fact: Until parents are equipped to accurately understand and prevent the impact of mass media, children cannot develop authentic self-identity. With on-going overuse and misuse of screen technologies and over-attention to popular culture, there will always be too many children and teens emotionally and socially immature, intellectually stunted, and spiritually hungry. Their self-identity is stripped away from them!

Read the Rest of the Article…

Parenting Tip

Looking for a great book on ideas for parenting well in today's complex society? Karen Bierdeman, PCI Certified Parent Coach® and owner of www.theGuiltFreeMom.com recommends the following:

Branded: The Buying and Selling of Teenagers by Alissa Quart

Buy, Baby, Buy by Susan Gregory Thomas

Consuming Kids: The Hostile Takeover of Childhood by Susan Linn

Last Child In The Woods by Richard Louv

Using Your Values to Raise Your Child to Be An Adult You Admire by Harriet Heath

Putting Family First: Successful Strategies for Reclaiming Family Life In A Hurry-Up World by William Doherty

The Intentional Family by William Doherty


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This issue of Parent Express was originally published September 28, 2007. Some content, contact information, and links may be out of date, and the conversion from the original email edition may introduce formatting inconsistencies.

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The Parent Coaching Institute's governing documents, conflict of interest policy, and financial statements are available upon request.
Please contact info@thepci.org or (425) 449-8877.